Building Honey Bee Boxes

You have three choices when it comes to getting a honey bee box: buy a complete box for a lot of money, buy separate parts and put them together for less money, or build all your parts from scratch and save over 50% of your money. Regardless of which option you choose, you should always purchase your supplies from an esteemed bee seller. Buying cheap supplies not only will not last very long, it may also cause damage to your bees (and your honey!). Always use untreated wood – typically pine or cedar.[3] None of the boxes/supers have bottoms, so
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Don’t Miss The Mite Treatment Window

If you are planning to treat your bees for mites, do not wait until late fall.  By late fall, the mites have typically already done their damage and the bees are too weak to tolerate a treatment.  Your treatment will have the best effect in late summer, when both the bee and mite populations are at their highest.
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Facts About Honey Bees

There are three types of bees in the hive – Queen, Worker and Drone. The queen may lay 600-800 or upto 1,500 eggs each day during her 3 or 4 year lifetime. This daily egg production may equal her own weight. She is constantly fed and groomed by attendant worker bees. Honey bees can fly at up to 15 miles per hour. Honey bees’ wings stroke 11,400 times per minute, thus making their distinctive buzz. Honey bees are the only insect that produce food for humans. Honey bees will usually travel approximately 3 miles from their hive. Honey bees are
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Don’t Wait Too Long Without A Queen

Get into the habit of looking for young brood and eggs whenever you inspect your colony.  If you see evidence that your colony is without a queen, you need to act as quickly as possible to secure a replacement queen.  Otherwise, you will either lose the entire colony or end up with a colony of laying workers, which is very difficult to deal with.
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